internet

VISION FOUR 5 – Ritual of Love EP (reissue)

VISION FOUR 5 – Ritual of Love EP

https://Xelon.lnk.to/EACpp

Officially this is the first single from the upcoming debut album ‘Texture’. This single switched gears for the band musically by releasing on CD which opened up an above the line distribution channel and split the sound into singles for radio and vinyl/remixes for clubs and rave. The vocals were delivered by Sheree Exton, who sang previously on Cyberphobia and much later on ‘B the 1’ on the second album ‘Humid’. While we’re on the topic of the vocalists who worked with Vision Four 5, here’s the shout out to all those talented and diverse singers:

Emma Baker Spink: The first vocalist, met in clubs and full of good vibes. Emma sang on ‘Love Power’ which formed part of the independent release ‘Deep Fantasy’

Sheree Exton: Introduced through a former lecturer and vocal coach, singing on ‘Cyberphobia’, Ritual of Love’, both of which she appeared in the video’s for and later ‘B the 1’

Yolanda Podolski: Conservatorium opera graduate and lead singer of cool indie/electro band (also featuring stable mate Paul Mac from Itch-e & Scratch-e) The Lab, singing on ‘United’ from the second album ‘Humid’

Lollie: The distinct sound and sights of club/cabaret personality Lollie, who co-wrote and sanf on ‘Funkify Yourself’ and ‘Purple Lamp’ as well as writing the lyrics for ‘B the 1’. What a team. She is a prolific talent who would take instrumentals to another dimension and turn them into killer songs with a unique and quirky appeal.

Thematically ‘Ritual of Love’ is a reflection of the clubbing lifestyle and rituals of mateship taking place in a modern social context. The original video played on this theme from the fervid to the frigid, extending the idea to body as landscape.

It was made on one of the first Avid digital non-linear edit suites in Australia and won a digital design award the year it was released.

Vision Four 5 always approached electronic music from a band, not a DJ perspective and included video and interactivity at the same experiential level for their shows. Touring and gigging was an essential part of writing and developing the material, both musical and visual, which was then released as singles albums and videos.

It’s an exciting time to be able to release the entire catalogue in it’s original form on all digital formats, with a few extra’s thrown in, to re-connect the music of the 90’s with people and find new audiences, which helps people understand how we got here.

By Noel Burgess
22/07/2016
https://www.facebook.com/visionfour5

original post @ https://www.facebook.com/visionfour5/posts/1413085998705375

Audible Women

Audible Women is an online directory for women who make some kind of art that can be listened to. It is open to women who make sound, sound art, noise and music (acoustic or electronic) with a bit of an experimental and exploratory bent.

Visit the site for more info or to submit something
http://www.audiblewomen.com

::: location:

predominantly male versus male

"Hackers, gamers and cyborgs" by Brendan Keogh
https://overland.org.au/previous-issues/issue-218/feature-brendan-keogh
"The story of computers transitioning from the flesh to the digital, from the clerical (feminine) to the militaristic (masculine), provides a compelling origin myth for the digital computer." is a great sentence. where clerical (feminine) is in the context of women being the first "manual computers", where the name "computer" came from - it was good to see that the writer acknowledged this.

BUT this paragraph needs to be clarified:
"Even as computers became increasingly significant devices in the last decades of the twentieth century, they remained entrenched in broader patriarchal structures that inscribed them as mathematical, scientific, important – that is, as male. They were embedded, more often than not, in parts of society already explicitly gendered: the science lab, the maths classroom and, when they moved to the home, the son’s bedroom rather than the daughter’s."

I think the writer should add a "predominantly" to next paragraph: "that is, as male" --> "that is, as predominantly male" & another clarification in the next sentence also. it was not "explicitly gendered", it was "predominantly gendered".

because there were and are some women who fit his example, myself being one. it was always annoying to be classed as "male" in this regard, when clearly, I and other women are not male. university researchers even did studies on us (two) female engineers at work in late 1980s/1990s asking how we felt to be doing "male jobs" which I found to be strange since I was doing my job, so how could it be a male job. & since I did physics (albeit only girl in class), chem, higher maths when at high school the statement is not true that it's male only. it needs to be clarified: "predominantly male", yes ok, I can agree with that

these statements are still annoying. as if we don't exist / are invisible.
and there are many more girls & women doing these things these days also - just as there were other women when I started, and women before me too. plus I did have a computer at home growing up (it was in the loungeroom so both I and my sister could use it, not the bedroom), not only the boys did. I programmed it too. as everyone did back then. and I'm sure there were other girls doing it too, across the world.

I can't see where to comment of the article, so ranting here (& twitter). if anyone has the writer, Brendan Keogh's contact pls let me know so I can let him know. if he's a PhD candidate at RMIT University then surely he should know better. I'm surprised his supervisor allows these declarative statements, and the editors of Overland Literary Journal too. with all the articles every day about women leaving technology you'd think people would start writing the history more accurately. adding one clarifying word can make a difference. women have been written out of history already too much!!

and now that article is in print, for yet another inaccuracy to continue. it seems things will never change.

I find it completely ironic that Brendan Keogh should write an article about gamergate and women in gaming "in the context of the broader patriarchal structures" and yet he write about women in computing / technology by applying those same patriarchal structures, leaving them out of history, and even though he admits that the article is flawed, does not want to correct the mistakes or improve it. how different is this to gamergate really anyway? to me, it's the exact same attitude.

it's just annoying and disappointing. when people write the history of tech / computing without women, and especially the exact examples used in that article which I know to be incorrect (as I was doing them) it feels like they are dissolving the past ~30 years of my life. why wouldn't they just add 1-2 words to include women in tech. someone else complained about his comments on gamers being male-only too, so I was glad to read it wasn't only me taking issue with it. not that it made much difference.

and yes, I was playing games during this time also - it's not a male-only characteristic as is implied later in the article.

I'm disappointed in overland too - I expected more, especially after reading their values on 'about' page. so much for "democratisation of politics and culture, providing room for diverse and marginal voices alongside the established and the authoritative" & the rest

update: I posted this on the Overland Facebook page for the article also. I was sent the author's contact details via twitter and had a conversation with him about changing the article. it may be possible to have the web version updated, but sadly the printed version will still be inaccurate.

update 20/04/2015: I asked the author, Brendan Keogh, how the update was going and he said he wasn't going to update it.
he also questioned why I replied to his tweets so my followers could see - well, it's not so they could reply also (although one friend did), it's because I believe it's safer for women, online and offline, to have witnesses when dealing with difficult men, which he proved himself to be

Brendan Keogh @BRKeogh · 11m 11 minutes ago
@AliaK Hi! Saw your tweets but didn't wanna just jump in. Ultimately, yes I agree. I leave things implied that should've been more explicit





@AliaK: Apr 16 @BrendonKeugh hi, I think there should be a few clarifications rather than declarative statements in your article.
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BrendonKeugh I enjoyed the history you wrote about, but it's not 100% male. I wrote my comments on overland fb page https://www.facebook.com/overland/posts/912913555397284
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK Hi! Saw your tweets but didn't wanna just jump in. Ultimately, yes I agree. I leave things implied that should've been more explicit
@AliaK: Apr 16 can you have the article changed? @BRKeogh it makes a difference
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK possibly tho it's just a reprint of a print article. Do you just want 'overwhelmingly' replaced with 'predominately?'
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK Or am i misunderstanding which part you take issue with?
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh overwhelminly is fine. the paragraph starting with ""Even as computers became increasingly significant devices" needs clarifying
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh "that is, as male" -> "that is, as predominantly/overwhelmingly male" whichever word, just to clarify not imply 100% male. +
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK Right I getcha. I meant 'inscribed as male' as in 'naturalised by society as male' not 'only males use computers' but i see how...
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh + "in parts of society already explicitly gendered" this needs clarifying too. explicitly reads as though it's 100% male, when not
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK ..that is unclear. Really I should've used 'masculine', not 'male'.
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh even masculine is not correct. I think if you wrote 'inscribed as male' even, it would have been better.
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh as there are women/girls doing these things too, how can it be male-only or masculine-only. it's not logical. majority, sure
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK well my intent was to say 'inscribed as male'! 'Inscribed as x, y, z--that is, [inscribed] as male'
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh each declarative statement saying male only, just belittles women's work. we are ignored enough as it is without continually being
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK but maybe. I should've repeated the verb rather than have it implied that's the verb the clause is linking back to
‏@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh written out of history
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh I've made suggestions on how to improve the wording. I'll leave it up to you to decide what is best to use
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK But i don't think I ever say 'male only'. Huge difference between a space being inscribed/naturalised as male and...
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK no women at all being in that space. I say as much explicitly further down to stress that point.
@BRKeogh: Apr 16 @AliaK And I appreciate the feedback. Thanks!
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh "that is, as male" - where are the female here? explicitly gendered - the son’s bedroom rather than the daughter’s.
@AliaK: Apr 16 @BRKeogh each sentence should be correct or it's wishy washy anyway.

update 20/04/2015: I asked the author, Brendan Keogh, how the update was going and he said he wasn't going to update it.


@AliaK: Apr 20 how did you go changing the overland article @BRKeogh to be more inclusive of women in tech? it still seems unchanged?
@BRKeogh: Apr 20 @AliaK I respect & appreciate your critique of the piece but I don't agree that edit needs to be made and I won't be changing it, no.
@AliaK: Apr 20 that's different to what you said last week? why the change of view? @BRKeogh
‏@BRKeogh: Apr 20 @AliaK I still agree the piece overall could be better, which is what I said last week.
@BRKeogh: Apr 20 @AliaK Also, I'd appreciate it if you didn't move my @ to the end of the tweet to try to get your followers onto me.
@AliaK: Apr 20 why would that worry you @BRKeogh. I also don't appreciate lip service "respect & appreciate" - actions speak louder than words
@AliaK: Apr 20 you also said the web version could be updated and then proceeded to talk about what word to use over numerous tweets. then nothing @BRKeogh
@BRKeogh: Apr 20 @AliaK Well I do appreciate the feedback even if I disagree on the particular sentence. Anyway, have a good evening.

web version of the article archived 21/04/2015: http://www.aliak.com/files/Hackers_gamers_and_cyborgs-218_Autumn_2015-Br... (ZIP)
letter to Overland editors 22/04/2015: http://www.aliak.com/files/predominantly_male_versus_male-email_to_overl... (PDF)

::: location:

The Artro - Seoul Arts Directory

visit http://eng.theartro.kr/artDirectory for The Artro - Seoul Arts Directory

::: location:

::: category:

CFP: The 2015 Totally Huge New Music Festival Symposium

The 2015 Totally Huge New Music Festival Symposium
Call for Papers
via http://www.tura.com.au/tura-program/the-2015-totally-huge-new-music-fest...

The 2015 Totally Huge New Music Festival Symposium
Thursday May 21
The State Library of Western Australia, Perth Cultural Centre

Theme: Western Australian Art Music: 1970 – 2014
in association with the launch of the Western Australian New Music Archive

Keynote Speakers:
Stephen Adams, Australian Music Producer, ABC Classic FM.
A/Prof Cat Hope, Project Leader, Western Australian New Music Archive.

The Australian Research Council Linkage funded Western Australian New Music Archive (WANMA) will be launched at the State Library of Western Australia on Wednesday 20th of May 2015 as part of the 12th Totally Huge New Music Festival in Perth, Western Australia.

Papers for an associated one-day symposium the following day are sought, on the theme of “Western Australian Art Music Activity: 1970 – 2014” to celebrate the launch of WANMA, a digital archive focusing on the Western Australian art music since 1970 to the present day.

The call is for papers and panel proposals around remembering Western Australian music, in particular music with links to Western Australian composers, performers, writers, events, music series, writing, artists and other associated organisations or people. Monographs on or interviews with Western Australian composers, ensemble, curators or events are particularly welcome.

Composers that are likely to feature in the early iteration of the archive include Ross Bolleter, Alan Lamb, David Pye, Cathie Travers, Hannah Clemen, Lindsay Vickery, James Ledger, Iain Gradage, Roger Smalley, Chris Tonkin, Rupert Guenther, Nela Trifkovic, Rob Muir, Stephen Benfall, Chris Cobilis and many current WA composers. Ensembles and performers such as Alea, Pi Ensemble, the WASO New Music ensemble, Axis 21, Skadada, Decibel, Magnetic Pig, Energia, Headkikr, KAK, Lux Mammoth, Smidrin, Steve Richter, The High Impedence, Jo Re Mi, Tetrafide, Defying Gravity, Schvendes and student ensembles from UWA and WAAPA past and present. Events such as Club Zho, Totally Huge New Music Festival, Scale Variable, WAAPA and UWA lunchtime concerts, Noisemachin!, Guerilla Sessions and any current activity.

The papers will be double blind peer reviewed and published in Volume 5 of “Soundscripts”.

Abstracts between 300 and 500 words due by Feb 25 2015.
Notification of acceptance 10 March 2015.
Registrations due 15 April 2015 $100 for all.

Abstracts to conference@tura.com.au

Presented by Tura, WAAPA, SLWA and The Musicological Society of Australia

::: location:

female:pressure

female pressure is an international network of female artists in the fields of electronic music: from musicians, composers and DJs to visual artists, cultural workers and researchers. A worldwide resource of female talent that can be searched after criteria like location, profession, style or name. "Why are there so few women active in the electronic music scene?" - each one of us has heard this question a thousand times... Here is the answer: It's not our number, it's about how and if we are recognized!

female:pressure intends to strengthen networking, communication and representation - a standard instrument to obtain information about artists, contact them, and find out about other, maybe less known women working in the fields of electronic music all around the globe.

via http://www.femalepressure.net/fempress.html
visit http://www.femalepressure.net for more details

::: location:

HYSTERIA feminist platform and collective

HYSTERIA is a periodical, platform and collective for feminist poetry, testimonies, essays, comments, photography, performances, videos, paintings, opinions, excerpts, objections and all mediums of expression.

They are looking for radical and boundary-breaking feminist works spanning a wide range of topics from collectives, individuals, defiant institutions.
see more at: http://www.hystericalfeminisms.com/submit

::: location:

The Archive of Digital Art (ADA)

INVITATION FOR SCHOLARS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE ARCHIVE OF DIGITAL ART
================>
The Archive of Digital Art invites scholars to make contributions:
www.digitalartarchive.at !

The Archive of Digital Art (ADA) expands its field of contributors. Most recently, not only artists, but also scholars can become members of
the vivid online community of the archive.

Since its foundation in 1999, the Archive of Digital Art (former Database of Virtual Art) has become the most important academic online archive for media art. In cooperation with established media artists and institutions it has been documenting the rapidly evolving world of digital art and its related fields for more than a decade and contains today a selection of thousands of artworks at the intersection of art, science, and technology.

Scholars are now invited to upload their publications, information on conferences, exhibitions and teaching to the archive. Thus, they are represented in the archive and can work collaboratively with artists on the documentation and analysis of digital art. Amongst others, collective keywording of media art works is carried out.

Scholars can also use the new ADA “light box” tool which facilitates the examination and comparison of images for research and
teaching. Interested scholars may apply for an account here:
https://www.digitalartarchive.at/support/account-request.html

::: location:

Real Talk: Aboriginal Rappers Talk About Their Music And Country book

via https://sites.google.com/site/realtalkthebook

When industry magazine The Music Network asked Australian hip-hop pioneer Urthboy to write about the state of the country's rap scene, his answer took some by surprise. Instead, the Herd member and Elefant Traks boss wrote this: “I was asked to write about the state of hip-hop in Australia. I’d prefer to shine a light on what may be the future of it: Indigenous Hip-Hop. Indigenous artists carry a profoundly engrossing and intriguing story for international audiences, yet it’s barely understood by many Australians.”

This book aims to be an introduction to some of the Aboriginal hip-hop artists out there. All have stories that demand to be heard, from the better-known players like The Last Kinection, Jimblah and Sky’high, to those who are probably too radical for the establishment to handle - such as Provocalz, whose interview ends with the interviewer and interviewee both being questioned by police.

The book is by no means comprehensive - there are about 50 Aboriginal hip-hop artists pumping out quality tracks at the moment, and it speaks to only half of them. But it aims to be a live document, updated at the start of each year. Hopefully it will become more comprehensive as the years tick by. At any rate, readers are encouraged to seek out the artists and follow them in their own, unedited, words.

Reviews:
"A must-read." - I Am Hip-Hop magazine, UK. "A hell of a read - with rappers holding forth on everything from politics to family, books, poetry, activism, homophobia, police brutality... and just about anything else you can think of." - The Koori Mail. "Incredible read." - Jimblah, on the Impossible Odds interview. "Want to read all about me and my thoughts? This is the one right now!" - Briggs. "Amazing interview with Impossible Odds. Everyone should read that interview." - Ozi Batla. "The most articulate and well-researched article on the band I've ever read." - Fred Leone, Impossible Odds. "Probably the most awesome article on Desert Pea Media I have ever seen." - Toby Finlayson, Desert Pea Media. "Of all the interviews we've done - and we've done a hell of a lot - this was, without a doubt, by far the the best." - Kings Konekted. "Best interview I've done. Props." - Provocalz. "Mat always does a good job with the interviews." - Indij hip-hop show founder Munk.

The author, Mat Ward, is a journalist who lives in Sydney. He is not Indigenous. Read more about why he wrote the book here. For more information contact RealTalkTheBook@gmail.com.

The book is available on Amazon (kindle) and all proceeds go to Koori Radio. Visit the book's website to read sample chapters and for more information

For another article on MonkeyMarc and his work with the Barkly community of beat makers and to listen to some of their music, take a look at Boom Bap in the Barkly – Check Australia’s Freshest Desert Beats

::: location:

Hilltop Hoods Initiative $10000 cash incentive towards releasing your album

The HTH Initiative is a $10,000 cash incentive funded by Hilltop Hoods and APRA AMCOS to help emerging Australian Hip Hop and Soul artists to manufacture, market, and release an album. In past years the initiative was restricted to South Australian residents but since 2009 it has been made available to applicants Australia-wide. In addition to the $10,000 in funding, the winner will receive legal advice courtesy of David Vodika and Media Arts Lawyers which can be used for general legal or specific career advice, plus a Zoo York Clothing prize pack and a Love Police ATM Merch Manufacturing Start-Up Kit (to the value of $500).

via http://www.apraamcos.com.au/hth-2015 - visit the APRA AMCOS site or read more for details

::: location:

Help make pouches for orphaned joeys

Wildlife rescuers are in need of pouches for orphaned joeys. They provide warmth and comfort, like being in their mother’s pouch. But they need to be changed regularly. for more details and the pattern, visit http://www.ifaw.org/australia/get-involved/help-make-pouches-orphaned-joeys

::: location:

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts course

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts introduces you to the study of early text technologies, focusing principally on the medieval book, but covering other textual objects, too, such as scrolls and diplomata. The Digging Deeper team of scholars from Stanford and Cambridge reveals how to investigate manuscripts within repository settings and through online resources, what to look out for when confronted with manuscript images, and how to exploit all the information a manuscript offers. You will learn major characteristics of book production, the terms and methods used by manuscript historians to describe the book, and key themes in early book history. Where were manuscripts made and who made them? What kinds of materials were used and what can those materials tell us? What kinds of texts were created and copied during these centuries? How did multilingualism matter in the medieval period? In pursuing these questions, you will study some of the most significant and beautiful books held by the university libraries of Cambridge and Stanford.

Digging Deeper is a six-week course, with each week featuring filmed sequences of experts with manuscripts, reading assignments, a short transcription, and self-testing quizzes. Assignments will help you develop a basic knowledge of how to access manuscripts in person and online, skills in codicology (the study of the medieval book and the physical make-up of manuscripts), palaeography (the describing and analysis of medieval scripts), and transcription (the reading and interpretation of writing in manuscripts). Participants who finish the course will earn a Stanford Statement of Accomplishment.

Digging Deeper: Making Manuscripts will be followed in Spring with a course focusing on the interpretation and preservation of manuscripts in the digital era.

via https://class.stanford.edu/courses/English/DiggingDeeper1/Winter2015/about

::: location:

::: category:

CFP: Fans, Videogames and History

CFP: Fans, Videogames and History
via http://blogs.flinders.edu.au/play-it-again/2015/01/20/cfp-fans-videogame...

Over the last two decades, a substantial amount of research has addressed the fan culture phenomenon, particularly in relation to film and television; the focus has centred on the impact that fan communities can and have had on the ‘official’ creative works that are released by film and television studios. More recently, researchers have examined the impact that the internet has played in empowering and expanding the fan network and fan communication structures, and in affecting the production, marketing and audience engagement with the fan object.

Games are now central objects of study within Fan Studies, yet to date there has been only isolated consideration of gaming’s long history of fandom, and fans’ important roles in game history and preservation. Little academic writing has focused on the impact and centrality that fan communities play — as a collective intelligence, as a pool of individual creators of games, and as interested and engaged parties in the collecting and remembering of game history.

For this anthology we seek essays that address issues that come out of the various possible configurations of the terms: fans, games, and history. We invite proposals for chapters addressing one of three broad axes:

• Historicising game fandom
• Fan contributions to game history
• Methodological reflections on studying historic game fandom

We invite abstracts of 500 words that address the relationship between game fans and history. Possible themes and issues may include but are not limited to:

• Fan communities and the preservation of games • Online communities and gamer memories • Digital fandom before the internet • Nostalgia and history • Historicising fans’ creative output • Magazines and fanzines as sources • how to ‘do’ fan history • Fans as authors of game history

Please send an abstract and brief bio to the editors by 30th April, 2015. Full papers to be submitted by 30th August 2015.

Email: playitagain@flinders.edu.au

Editors – Melanie Swalwell, Angela Ndalianis, Helen Stuckey
- See more at: http://blogs.flinders.edu.au/play-it-again/2015/01/20/cfp-fans-videogame...

::: location:

New Weird Australia project has closed down

New Weird Australia is concluding its mission after five years in operation, and will mark the moment with a three-volume set titled "Passages".

Each volume is curated by one of New Weird Australia's three directors - Stuart Buchanan, Andrew Tuttle and Innez Tulloch - and features 51 tracks from the project archive, including music from Holy Balm, Guerre, Kučka, No Zu, Kirin J Callinan, Oscar Key Sung, Matthew Brown, Chrome Dome, Mere Women and many more, with design by New Weird Australia art director, Heath Killen.

Since its inception in 2009, New Weird Australia has established a number of projects in support of Australian experimental music, clocking up over 400,000 downloads in five years, distributed through its own online channels and via its long-standing association with WFMU's Free Music Archive. New Weird Australia projects included its 23-volume compilation series, the acclaimed netlabel Wood & Wire, the "New Editions" series of individual artist releases, a long-running radio show on Sydney's FBi and a nationwide series of live shows.

New Weird Australia founder Stuart Buchanan notes: "When we launched five years ago, Australian experimental music was often frustratingly hard to uncover. We saw an opportunity to connect audiences into work that was beyond the fringes, and offer artists opportunities to widen their community. Although that mission could well be endless, online networks now afford artists easier access to fans and supporters, in ways we could not have imagined five years ago. This therefore feels like a good moment to conclude, to reflect on the collective achievements of all the artists involved, and to showcase some of the work that has made the project so compelling."

In addition to the 'Passages' compilation trilogy, New Weird Australia's netlabel, Wood & Wire, will release its final album featuring exclusive soundtracks recorded for FBi's "Ears Have Ears" experimental music program, with extended material from Fatti Frances, Rites Wild, Hollow Press and Cycle~ 440. Download from woodandwire.com.au.

The full New Weird Australia project archive will remain online indefinitely, acting as a record of a unique and vibrant period in the outer limits of Australian music.

http://newweirdaustralia.com/2015/01/new-weird-australia-concludes-with-...

::: location:

Understanding Contemporary Art class videos playlist

::: location:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - internet