art

this is you and me by Santiago

this is you and me is a digital painting by Santiago. It is a vibrant and dynamic scene, full of expression, movement and is dream-like as well. It feels to me as the artist has captured a glimpse of latent space, replicated a scene from a dream, and/or shown us a scene from a virtual world. Figures project from the walls, with arms open wide, reaching out with purpose. All but one figure is looking away from the viewer, to the right side of the frame, to the future. What are they trying to say to us? Perhaps it's as David Sylvian sings in Orpheus: "Sunlight falls, my wings open wide. There's a beauty here I cannot deny." Yet Orpheus is a sombre, haunting version of this painting. The visual scene in this work feels lighter, brighter and hopeful.


Santiago. this is you and me. 2023. Digital painting. 1488 x 1488 pixels. Reproduced from Twitter, https://twitter.com/neymrqz/status/1634976417246228480.

Apart from the figures, the wall also draws the viewer in, inviting them to take a closer look at the drawings and plants littered around the walls. Is this an interior room or exterior wall? The use of flat, bright and highly contrasted colours, particularly the pink and orange, speaks to the digital-ness of the landscape. The pink brushstroke in top left corner feels like thickly applied watercolour, where the paint pools on first stroke and you can just see the thickness of the brush and pooling of each row of applied colour. Yet it's the digital painterly feel, the unnatural, glossy, plastic-like paint as viewed on a glass screen, rather than on a piece of paper or canvas. There's an uncanny feel about the scene: the perspective is almost one point perspective, but not quite — the edges of the walls seem to have multiple, uneven joins, shifting the position of them. Is it one wall or many morphed together? This leads back to the dream-like quality and also suggests a virtual world. Are we seeing many moving images captured as one? The paintings on the walls are bounded by expressive thin lines, that could be ink or graphite. Some look like quick, expressive sketches, others finished works. It's the scene of an artist's fertile and imaginative mind, many future and past works and ideas in varying stages of completion. There's suggestions of portraits, and also eco/bio-influences, with the many pot plants and greenery littered across the walls, many suspended in air. The wall has cutout windows, at varying levels, merging the background into the foreground, adding interest to the scene. The floor is strewn with domestic objects, adding life to the scene — stools, tables and chairs, papers, even a dog, and a person curiously kneeling in the left corner with hands covering their face. Whilst the background is predominantly flat, there is depth and shading in the figures and furniture, adding an extra dimension to them, and making them more familiar to the viewer, despite their wonky forms.

Santiago is an artist from Uruguay in South America. I'm looking forward to researching more art from this region to see local influences, but in the meantime, looking with Australian eyes, I see glimpses of references such as Brett Whiteley, Russell Drysdale, Sydney Nolan and Fred Williams, albeit unintentionally by the artist. It makes me wonder which works Stable Diffusion 2 has been trained on, and what the prompt was for this scene.

Overall, a wonderful world-building painting, which invites the viewer to spend time with it, seeing more on each viewing.

See more of Santiago's work at: Teia, Objkt & SuperRare

References
Neymrqz. 2023. "this is you and me". Tweet. Twitter. Accessed on 13 March, https://twitter.com/neymrqz/status/1634976417246228480.

::: also published at https://aliak.substack.com/p/this-is-you-and-me-by-santiago and https://medium.com/@aliak/this-is-you-and-me-by-santiago-ab96c12406d0

::: artists:

::: category:

::: internet communication:

::: location:

Espacios comunes as places of connection

Espacios comunes is a code-based, generative artwork by Javier Graciá Carpio (jagracar) minted on fx(hash), with the main version plus 512 iterations. The drawing is made using P5.JS, with pixel sorting and added noise / texture via GLSL shaders.


Jagracar. Espacios comunes. 2023. Digital artwork. Variable sizes. Reproduced from Fx(hash), https://www.fxhash.xyz/generative/slug/espacios-comunes.

Initially I saw digital landscapes built up from atoms/points, forming over time. After reading the artist's description and translating the title as common spaces, I interpret the artist's intention of a collection of spaces as more socially based places. Jagracar describes the work as: "Horizontal, decentralized societies. Espacios comunes. We can see the circles, squares, plane cuts, but we cannot give them an order or authority" and further explained via a tweet: "It's more or less what we are doing in Tezos, right? Different backgrounds and shapes, but all well mixed and at the same decentralized level :)" By adding the social aspect to these spaces, Jagracar has reinforced their use as places — this fits with my research on the exploration of the blockchain as not a placeless space, it is actually a Place in the architectural and geographical theory sense, due to the communities active on it and social aspects. Jagracar's views of Espacios comunes could be seen as the topographical map, extending from and sitting alongside Paul Baran's decentralised network topologies diagram (as used by Vitalik Buterin also), to see the societies' view — another view of Haraway's tentacular thinking, where the interconnections between nodes/communities are closer, as with Tezos and its communities themselves.


Jagracar. "Tweet". 2023. Image of tweet reproduced from Twitter, https://twitter.com/jagracar/status/1629227616090587137?s=20.


AliaK. Paul Baran's network topology map, also used by Vitalik Buterin. 2022. Image screenshot reproduced from AliaK.com, http://aliak.com/content/specture-topology-and-context.

Espacios comunes is a durational work — the points creating the forms appear over time, drawn using P5.JS code. The points are displayed simultaneously, growing in intensity, so you see the whole image appear gradually, rather than it building different areas of the drawing sequentially — aligning to a progressive scan rather than interlaced scan; the digital over the analog. Texture is added via the addition of noise from the shaders, which are also doing some pixel sorting. In this world communities have grown in parallel, together, rather than sequentially where they would be waiting for one to start and finish before the next can be formed. The work uses varying colours from tuned palettes. Though it's described as a flat, 2D work from a conceptual perspective, the use of colours and textures applied via the shader provides dimensional and tonal aspects to the work.

The work is bounded by fixed borders, yet each iteration has a different support size. Instead of making a uniform dynamically sized work, the overall collection of iterations provides the variation in dimensions. Each collector's iteration depicts a new layout of the places, a new configuration of social interactions, new perspectives. This adds a multi-dimensional aspect to it. There are control commands which can be used to adjust the dimensions of the work, if the viewer wishes to interact with the work, in the same way that members of the communities can interact with and adjust the sizes of the communities and their involvements.

Overall, a beautiful debut for the artist on fx(hash) platform. Jagracar's earlier works can be found on Teia also via https://teia.art/jagracar
View the work and its iterations at https://www.fxhash.xyz/generative/slug/espacios-comunes

::: these notes / analysis are based on the context of my specture project research
::: also published at https://www.fxhash.xyz/article/espacios-comunes-as-places-of-connection and https://medium.com/@aliak/espacios-comunes-as-places-of-connection-d8c00...

Haraway, Donna J. 2016. Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene (Experimental Futures). Durham and London: Duke University Press.
Buterin, Vitalik. 2017. "The Meaning of Decentralization." Medium. https://medium.com/@VitalikButerin/the-meaning-of-decentralization-a0c92....
Rand Corporation. 2022. "Paul Baran and the Origins of the Internet." Rand Corporation. Accessed on 15 September, https://www.rand.org/about/history/baran.html.

::: artists:

::: internet communication:

::: location:

print day

was too humid to write today so I made some gelli prints, exploring different colour combinations and textures

cartridge drawing paper and acrylic paint

::: location:

Flora | Fauna #2 exhibition

The Flora | Fauna #2 exhibition opened at Tz1and place# 474 on 28 May 2022. Organized by the bad lament (#154) and Pearl Hyacinth (#162) and presented by CleanNFTs, Teia and Tz1and, the exhibition included works minted exclusively in Tz1and from artists and Tz1andians: 852Kerfunkle, AliaK, anahdraws, Blase, Carla Knopp, Chris Coleman, Filipe Mecenas, Kelly Richardson, Keram Malicki-Sánchez, Kheelk, Luis E. Fraguada, Malicious Sheep, mawcreature, moonsoon, Ned Boyanov, Orfhlaith Egan, Ottis, Pearl Hyacinth, James Alec Hardy, Simon Wairiuko, Stu Sontier, thebadlament, v1tb1t, and We Throw Rocks. It followed on from the Flora | Fauna #1 exhibition held in Cryptovoxels in April 2021 for Earth Day.

In keeping with the exhibition's theme, the open-air gallery building created by Pearl Hyacinth allowed visitors to take advantage of the virtual world and fly above the space to see a bird's eye view of the art as well as walk around for a close-up view of the works ranging from 2D framed images and 3D art objects. Many artists created plant focused digital paintings, prints and photographic works based on both nature and imagination, with a few animals featured also, such as a pair of cats, swans, a dinosaur and a platypus. Grasses and flowers were placed throughout the gallery as well as the grounds outside, leading visitors to walk through the space in quiet contemplation of the works, taking time to explore each one. Trees sprouted multi-coloured branches and leaves through the open ceiling of the gallery, allowing the viewer to explore the works in all directions and dimensions.

Voice chats were held May 28 7AM & May 29 9PM (UTC) in the Tz1and Discord channel as part of the exhibition launch, and Carolyn and Ryan from Teia Community captured a walkthrough video of the exhibition at Teia Community /// FLORA | FAUNA 2 Exhibit in Tz1and @ Place#474

Flora and Fauna 2 Exhibition Video Walkthrough
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhcKc1H1RK0

::: via: 
https://www.tz1and.com/blog/8924

specture ::: topology and context

specture ::: the topology and conceptual contexts underpinning my specture body of work ::: explorations of interconnectedness and 'evolution' of extinct species on/and the blockchain

::: speculative|species ::: future|architecture ::: https://butiq.art/aliak/specture

specture is a speculative exploration considering the interconnections and abstractions of extinct species (from NSW) on the blockchain, with the underlying idea: what if in the future this is the only place they exist?

The blockchain is an immutable technological system, where data stored on it remains forever (or for as long as the chain exists). I build conglomerations of generative, code-based systems mixed with 3D digital models to create digital drawings and animations as abstractions of the extinct species and their blockchain environment, to garner what the species might see and experience whilst inside the blockchain. These generative drawings imagine whether the species could evolve once in the blockchain, or would they reach their final form once stored there. They also reflect the decentralized entanglement in interconnectedness in both ecology and the blockchain.

::: location:

specture mindmap

specture ::: rewilding the blockchain mindmap as at 13 March 2022 (further updates yet to be added)
key artists / readings / links shown ::: others are listed separately in bibliography & project documents

green=explored (at some level)
black=to be explored
grey=excluded from current exploration (possible future)

::: category:

::: location:

lament for hic et nunc

it feels like we're grieving, for the loss of a website/system, though it was more than just a website; it was an idea and some say, a movement. hic et nunc [now a broken link], designed and built by Brazilian developer, Rafael Lima, was|is a generic architecture|system|platform for exploring decentralised blockchain uses that morphed into an art focused obkjt|NFT collection space|lab|dApp on the more eco-friendly Proof of Stake based Tezos blockchain. it came with a warning — This is an experimental dApp, use it at your own risk. Lima's design is an elegant architecture that works on multi levels — the objkt (NFT/art work) level, the platform (single site/front-end) level and the network|multisite|eco system level. hic et nunc brought beauty into the tech; art into the tech; the aesthetic into the tech; art and elegance into the architecture. it felt more feminine than many of the tech-bro developed platforms that surround it in the crypto landscape. the UI design was|is simple and clean, focusing on the art, as a flat plane, that allows the eye to flow across and above and below the page|space viewing art within the webpage frame. there were no popup menus invading|colonising your space|view|frame. everything was within — a plane of immanence (Davis 2021; RainDropUp 2008; Wikipedia 2021), with simple, flat navigation, subtley showing via collections and presentation, that everything is connected to something (Haraway 2016a; Haraway 2016b; Rose 2008; van Dooren 2014*), one art work led to the next, one artist connected to another, links between them all, point to point, peer to peer. there were no leaderboards, no transcendency, everyone and every piece of art was equalised by the immanent design — by the OBJKT and the SUBJKT (RainDropUp 2008).

a wash of emotions this past week, after hearing the news that Rafael had discontinued hicetnunc.xyz on November 11, 2021 (Nov 12 in Australia/Sydney). many articles have been posted about this (plus a few posts for context):

pataphysics in daily life — condensed poetic voodles — spacetwo videoblog

there was a mention of pataphysics in one of the mu-mesons' videos we've been watching over the holidays. reminded me of Sam Renseiw's spacetwo videoblog. nice to see he's still making them: "the fine art of 'pataphysics in daily life. condensed poetic voodles. A video blog by sam renseiw"

'Pataphysics, an absurdist concept coined by the French writer Alfred Jarry, is a philosophy dedicated to studying what lies beyond the realm of metaphysics. Defined as: "The science of imaginary solutions, which symbolically attributes the properties of objects, described by their virtuality, to their lineaments"

https://patalab02.blogspot.com

::: location:

::: via: 
https://patalab02.blogspot.com

Narciss

"Narciss is a naked robot in front of a mirror, exposed to describe his thoughts while looking at himself" — beautiful project. mentioned in Algorithmic Poetry class by Mario Guzman (@marioguzzzman). if only the computer knew it was seeing itself (or it's external HW at least) @SchoolOfMaaa

https://vimeo.com/273373088

Narciss from WALTZ BINAIRE on Vimeo.

::: location:

::: via: 
https://vimeo.com/273373088

Node Talk: Socially Engaged Art in Times of Social Distance

"In times of social distancing, how might we make socially engaged art?" — this is the question posed in the recorded talk, "Node Talk: Socially Engaged Art in Times of Social Distance" with Stine Marie Jacobsen on nodecenter

::: category:

::: location:

The Triumph of Modernism in the Art of Australia

28 Mar 2015 - 24 May 2015

Spans 60 years of Australian Art with over 50 iconic works by 26 artists who have shaped the development of modern art in Australia.

The Triumph of Modernism tells the story of a new identity in Australian art commencing post World War II with artists such as Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, Russell Drysdale, John Brack, John Perceval and Charles Blackman. Later years see the continuing development of modern art in the works of Fred Williams and John Olsen, and in more recent times in contemporary art by artists Imants Tillers, Howard Arkley and Aida Tomescu. The Triumph of Modernism is a rich and representative display of the story of modern Australia, with a particular and deliberate emphasis on Australian identity, although it is just a glimpse into the remarkable collections.

Curated for Hazelhurst by its patron, Edmund Capon, the exhibition provides an opportunity to see some works that are rarely made available for public viewing. “This is the first time Sydney audiences will be able to see the collection in such depth, revealing the strength and diversity it holds” said Belinda Hanrahan, Hazelhurst's Director. Edmund Capon says “My objective here has been to illustrate two themes; firstly the triumph of modernism in Australian art and, secondly, the particular qualities and strengths of the TarraWarra and Besen collections.”

Artists featured include Howard Arkley, George Baldessin , Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, John Brack, William Delafield Cook, William Dobell, Russell Drysdale, Ian Fairweather, Joy Hester, Dale Hickey, Roger Kemp, Joanna Lamb, Godfrey Miller, Sidney Nolan, John Olsen, John Perceval, Jeffrey Smart, Tim Storrier, Edwin Tanner, Imants Tillers, Aida Tomescu, Tony Tuckson, Brett Whiteley, Fred Williams and William Wright.

This exhibition is a partnership project between TarraWarra Museum of Art and Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre. The Triumph of Modernism will also be shown at TarraWarra Museum of Art from 21 June – 16 August 2015.

via http://www.sutherlandshire.nsw.gov.au/Community/Hazelhurst/Exhibitions/T...

::: category:

::: location:

The Archive of Digital Art (ADA)

INVITATION FOR SCHOLARS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE ARCHIVE OF DIGITAL ART
================>
The Archive of Digital Art invites scholars to make contributions:
www.digitalartarchive.at !

The Archive of Digital Art (ADA) expands its field of contributors. Most recently, not only artists, but also scholars can become members of
the vivid online community of the archive.

Since its foundation in 1999, the Archive of Digital Art (former Database of Virtual Art) has become the most important academic online archive for media art. In cooperation with established media artists and institutions it has been documenting the rapidly evolving world of digital art and its related fields for more than a decade and contains today a selection of thousands of artworks at the intersection of art, science, and technology.

Scholars are now invited to upload their publications, information on conferences, exhibitions and teaching to the archive. Thus, they are represented in the archive and can work collaboratively with artists on the documentation and analysis of digital art. Amongst others, collective keywording of media art works is carried out.

Scholars can also use the new ADA “light box” tool which facilitates the examination and comparison of images for research and
teaching. Interested scholars may apply for an account here:
https://www.digitalartarchive.at/support/account-request.html

::: location:

Solace – make flags for India Flint’s residency at The Observatory

prophet of bloom: an invitation: Solace

India Flint invites us all to contribute to her residency at The Observatory, in South Australia.

via http://prophet-of-bloom.blogspot.com.au/2014/09/an-invitation.html

Make a triangular flag or pennon [meaning a personal ensign, derived from the Latin penna meaning a wing or a feather] preferably using a piece of pre-loved cloth. Stitch on it a word or a phrase or a sentence that might act as a wish for peace or an acknowledgement of beauty, imply a sense of stillness or simply something that gives you solace. It can be as brief or as long as you like. A haiku, a snatch of song, a word that takes you where you want to be. Attach ties to the tethering end of your flag.

It is important the flags be made from natural fibre fabrics as they will remain in place following prayer flag tradition, to dispense blessings and good wishes to the four winds…any shreds that part company from the whole must be bio-degradable. Additional decorations such as stone or glass beads, shell or wooden buttons are welcome, but please, no plastic.
Post the flag [preferably packaged in paper* not plastic] to :

‘solace’
c/- The Observatory
PO Box 96
Andamooka 5722
South Australia
Australia

for full details see India’s website: http://prophet-of-bloom.blogspot.com.au/2014/09/an-invitation.html

107 Projects call out for volunteers

107 Projects is looking for budding event managers, curators, creative directors, tech heads, photographers and people interested in social media and design.

107 Projects is a not-for-profit, artist run, multi-disciplinary creative space in the heart of Redfern, Sydney, with a creative program that spans music, theatre, poetry, visual arts, and everything in-between.

They are currently seeking intelligent, energetic and enthusiastic volunteers who want to get involved by assisting with the delivery of creative programs as well as those wanting to get some serious arts admin experience.

If you are keen and have some spare time to share with then, send an email listing your previous related experience (if any), and whether you'd like to be involved with visual art, music, performance, admin or all of the above to volunteer@107projects.org

more details at the 107 Projects website

::: location:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - art