artist profile

Hunter & Mortar - Fear and Loathing

Hunter & Mortar - Fear and Loathing—a few words with Hunter SBX about his new album with Mortar—this was originally an article for ozhiphop.com : article in forum & on http://officialozhiphop.tumblr.com. by AliaK 31/05/2011. Thanks very much to Hunter for taking the time to answer my rambling questions

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Greg Jenkins - composer and performer

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greg jenkins - composer and performer

greg jenkins composes directly with the inherent musicality of sounds, making harmony, melody and rhythm subservient to sonic texture and spatiality. He will often extrapolate sonic minutiae into whole compositions for example by "zooming in" on a tiny fragment of recorded voice then using this as the basis of a droning musical weft.

greg also likes to hit things; things such as suspended arrays of inverted flower pots; things such as beer kegs; and things such as midi percussion controllers which allow him to subversively remap non-percussive sound objects to percussive performance gestures. He frequently makes use of "micro-gestures" - subtle physical manipulations of computer hardware which control software synthesis engines allowing him to perform directly on the software in real time. greg is also known as "cactusman" due to his penchant for using a cactus as an amplified acoustic instrument.

Tim Gruchy

Tim Gruchy is a prolific Australian video art, music & installation artist who has performed since the 1980s. his website has examples & listings of his video works, exhibitions, fashion events, parties, corporate events, theatre & opera works, and academic lectures & courses. http://www.grup.tv

stencil print by SYKE

280920082113, originally uploaded by AliaK

this is Sydney / Newtown artist SYKE - her myspace is www.myspace.com/syke23

SYKE started an outdoor art area in newtown (sydney) where she and other artists paint and then people can donate what they can for the art works. I think they'd suit the as often the works are on sections of cardboard boxes. the article mentions sometimes kids save up their pocket money to buy some... nice way to start kids appreciating art & craft / creating things instead of buying mass produced wares

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stencil print by Peter Strong

280920082112, originally uploaded by AliaK

this is a print from Peter Strong - one of the Ohms Not Bombs crew

"These canvas's are mixed media works by Peter Strong.

Sticky Institute - Melbourne's zine store

I visited the Sticky Institute in Melbourne yesterday and bought a few zines and recorded a video asking the team a few basic questions about zines. The store has a wide selection of zines, and there's a membership / mail list where you can sign up and receive zines in the mail. If you're a zine-writer, you can contact the store and have them stock your zines. Their website also includes an impressive "Zineopedia" of Melbourne based zines which is a great resource for anyone wanting to find out more about zines. Though the best way would be to visit the store if you're in Melbourne, their website if you're not in Melbourne, or a local zine-festival and buy & read some zines. Or even better, start your own!

visit http://www.stickyinstitute.com for more details
store details :
Sticky Institute
Degraves St Subway
Shop 10 Campbell Arcade Melbourne
stickyshop @ gmail.com (remove the spaces)
(if you're not from Melbourne like me, it's opposite the train station on Flinders St, about half way (Flinders between Swanston & Elizabeth) - go downstairs towards the station subway and you'll see it)

PO Box 310 Flinders Lane Vic Australia 8009

One of the zines I bought was the "Anyone can.. " zine (anyone can make a zine) which launched the same day by the City Library Street Press. The City Library Street Press are quite active, having a few projects on the go and regular meetings at the library for zinesters and writers to get involved with. The "Anyone can.." zine also includes a MAP of Melbourne city showing writers & zinester spots of interest eg libraries, stores, artist spaces.

I also bought Anna Poletti's book "Intimate Ephemera : Reading Young Lives in Australian Zine Culture" whilst at Sticky. I've been to some of her panel sessions at the National Young Writers Festival in Newcastle & Critical Animals as part of This is Not Art (TiNA) over the years, so was glad to find her PhD book in the store too. The book is also available as an e-book (pdf) or d-book (pod / print on demand) from Melbourne University Publishing e-store

I haven't finished the book yet, but here's one passage about what a zine is [pg 11-12] :


"Personal zines do not share many of the characteristics of he texts that make up the bulk of sources studied in literary or cultural studies and, more specifically, scholarship on auto/biography. Of central importance to these non-traditional texts is the fact that sines are not mass-produced; they are not published by a professional publishing house, and thus not 'sanctioned as significant by [their] status as a mass produced commodity' (Huff 510). Moreover, zines are not easily available, do not participate in standardised modes of presentation and distribution, and are not well recognised within literary communities or among the reading (most commonly constituted as 'book-buying') public. Zines are homemade, ephermeral and amateur. They circulate among communities of readers through the mail, in out-of-the-way spaces, and are passed around hand-to-hand among social groups. They are also non-traditional because of the modes of emplotment that characterise them; in the case of personal zines, we find a unique mixture of established modes of life writing, such as the diary, alongside zine-specific narratives such as cut'n'paste collage. These material and textual idiosyncranasies challenge the literary critic to practise 'connected reading', which Gillian Whitlock describes as a practice which 'pulls at the loose threads of autobiography, and uses them to make sutures between, across and among autobiographical narratives' (Intimate Empire 204)".

I also like this definition by Richard A Stoddart and Teresa Kiser in Poletti's book [pg 27]
"Zines are a written product of the human need for self-expression. Beyond that, zines are hard to define."

on page 7-8, Poletti gives Duncombe's list for a 'zine taxonomy'. I thought this was very similar to the original definitions of video blogs when they'd first started (video blogs came after zines of course!) - my attempt was this video blog mind map before I realised it was crazy to try and define all the combinations - a simple all encompassing definition of 'video on a blog' was more appropriate, and did it matter anyway.. every now and then the videoblogging list starts up a new 'what is a video blog' thread - I suppose it is the same for all sub-communities that are less commonly known / new. the response below also reminds me of the videoblogging list arguments towards a simpler definition (or no definition), and at least a step away from a taxonomy.


"genres of zines: fanzines (broken down into subcategories by subject, that is music and sports), political zines, personal zines, scene zines (covering local and community events in the zinester's area), network zines (which review zine publications), fringe culture zines (covering UFOs, conspiracy theories and so on), religious zines, vocational zines (detailing 'life on the job'), health zines, sex zines, travel zines, comix, literary zines, art zines and 'the rest'"

... "the collapse of Duncombe's taxonomy into 'the rest - a large category' underscores the futility of attempting to solidify or organise a definition of zines based on their content. As Kirsty Leishman argues: 'Duncombe's work reveals that zines are ill contained and thus it is useful because it relieves subsequent researchers from pursuing such an arduous, yet futile, endeavour'(7)."

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blue (play) list 20080120

I love music by bluetech and have been listening to it a lot whilst in Israel having bought a few of his cds from the music stores here and ripped them to my laptop. his music is available on aleph - zero label and he's remixed other great artists such as Shulman & Pitch Black.

his website says "my name is evan. i make sounds. rivers of music ancient & delicate flow through me.". he has 3 myspace pages for the different artist names he uses : bluetech, evan bartholomew, evan marc

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The second edition of the Streaming Festival ended on the 28th of October 2007.

The second edition of the Streaming Festival ended on the 28th of October 2007.

The festival broadcasted four programs; documentary, fiction, animation and art plus three special programs.
Composed by the KAN festival was a special program presenting a select number of films including films from Agnieszka Smoczynska, Anna Maszczynska and Anna Pankiewicz.

artist biographies / profiles

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this section of the site contains music and arts artist biographies

Taiyo

TAIYO is an electronic music collaboration encompasing live trip-hop, trance, drum 'n' bass, acid house, DJs and sound engineers. Based in Brisbane, Australia. visit http://www.systemrecords.com.au for more details (old site is http://www.taiyo.thehub.com.au )

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TKCB - Its Not a Drug, It's a Lightshow

TKCB - Its Not a Drug, It's a Light Show

Travelling KaleidoscopiK Candle Bonanza, or Damo as he is known by his friends has being hiding behind the scenes in Brisbane for longer than most of us have being listening. Specializing in light as an artistic medium, Damo started out by doing "cans" and "spots" for some of Brisbane's more rock and punk orientated bands before moving into rave and dance culture. Responsible for many shows at some of Brisbane's earliest "old school" parties, he programmed lights and rigged bank upon bank of strobe and other rave orientated effects at parties such as NASA, Creation, Adrenalin and Black Out at venues such as The Site, B.E.C (Nasa/Adrenalin) and The Roxy.

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